Binding affinity and Kd, Differential Scanning Calorimetry, MicroCal, Tech Talk »

[11 Sep 2018 | ]
MicroCal PEAQ-DSC systems: FAQs

This blog answers FAQs on the new Automated and Manual MicroCal PEAQ-DSC systems. For more information, check your user manual, or contact your regional Malvern Panalytical Support.
 
 
 
Q: How much sample do I need to fill the MicroCal PEAQ-DSC cell?
For the MicroCal Automated PEAQ-DSC, you need to have at least 325 μL of the sample or buffer in the appropriate well of the 96-well plate. This is the default setting for the experimental setup. 300 μL is removed by the filling syringe.
You can use a larger sample volume (up to 400 μL)  and …

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Borate fusion, Claisse, Tech Talk, X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) »

[6 Sep 2018 | ]
The ABC’s of Platinumware for Sample Preparation by Fusion

Platinumware is used in sample preparation by fusion for XRF and ICP analysis. Crucibles (used for XRF and ICP analysis) and molds (only used for XRF) are made of 95% Pt and 5% Au.
Why use platinum and gold?
It has been proven that this alloy has a high melting point and can withstand extreme heat. Platinum has a great thermal conductivity and ensures very low contamination of the molten mixture during fusion. The addition of gold has a non-wetting effect. In short, the alloy of these two precious metals allows the …

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Customer experience, Electrophoretic light scattering, Meet the Experts, Zeta potential, Zetasizer »

[5 Sep 2018 | ]
Find the Field Strength in your Zetasizer

How can we obtain the applied field strength?
When performing electrophoretic light scattering (ELS) measurements, the sample is exposed to an externally applied electric field, and we observe the extra movement that the particles undergo as a result of the applied field with the changes in the phase difference between the un-scattered reference laser beam and the scattering from the particles. The electrophoretic mobility µ is the particle velocity v divided by the electric field strength E, where the field strength is the applied voltage over the distance between the electrodes [typically …

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Crystal Structure Determination, Empyrean, Phase identification, Phase quantification, Tech Talk, X'Pert³, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) »

[4 Sep 2018 | ]
Why stick to reflection geometry in powder diffraction?

Since I made my first steps in the powder diffraction community, I have been amazed by the many possibilities for collecting diffractograms. In this blog, I’ll describe how I learned about the advantages of transmission geometry over reflection geometry for specific samples.
In almost every powder diffractometer, the reflection geometry is being used: the detector is at the same side of the sample surface.
This geometry works very well for inorganic materials that can be prepared as flat samples with randomly oriented crystallites.
One of the disadvantages of reflection geometry is that it …

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