A couple of weeks ago, myself and John Duffy completed our series of webinars for the “Suspension Properties Masterclass

Rheology-masterclass

Throughout the series, we have both been very pleased with the large audiences for each webinar, it motivated us to make that little more effort to get the quality content. We discussed a lot of detail about how suspension and dispersions properties can be measured with rotational rheology, and then described how these properties can be controlled and influenced by particle properties, such as particle size, particle shape, size distribution and zeta potential.

Even with this series of five webinars, there is more that we could discuss. It is certainly a big, and varied topic, with a lot of interlinking relationships between the various materials properties. The main aim was to condense these relationships and generalize the trends to help with the understanding of this huge field.

We like to think this is what Malvern Instruments does best. Sure, we make scientific instrumentation for material property characterization which get more powerful, yet simpler to use with each iteration.

However, we don’t just sell instruments that give you a series of numbers. With the backup of our sales specialists, application specialists, technical specialists and helpdesk specialists we put these numbers into context. We help describe what these properties mean when related to the use of the sample.

We understand that the results are only important when put into context with your materials.

For those that missed any of the masterclass series, a list of the links can be found here:

1: Influence of particle size and distribution on rheology

2: Influence of particle shape on rheology

3: Influence of zeta potential on rheology

4: Using rheology to assess suspension stability

5: Measurement of yield stress

We had a few interesting questions throughout the masterclass, some which would be worth discussing more. So keep an eye on this blog where we discuss some of these thoughts…

If anyone has any further questions on suspension properties, please do not hesitate to contact John or myself (John.Duffy@malvern.com – Adrian.Hill@malvern.com).